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Every Thing you need to know about Diabetic Retinopathy By Utsav Eye Clinic

Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication that affects eyes. It’s caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (retina).

At first, diabetic retinopathy may cause no symptoms or only mild vision problems. Eventually, it can cause blindness.

The condition can develop in anyone who has type 1 or types 2 diabetes. The longer you have diabetes and the less controlled your blood sugar is, the more likely you are to develop this eye complication.

Symptoms
You might not have symptoms in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. As the condition progresses, diabetic retinopathy symptoms may include:

-Spots or dark strings floating in your vision (floaters)
-Blurred vision
-Fluctuating vision
-Impaired color vision
-Dark or empty areas in your vision
-Vision loss
-Diabetic retinopathy usually affects both eyes.

When to see a doctor
Careful management of your diabetes is the best way to prevent vision loss. If you have diabetes, see your eye doctor for a yearly eye exam with dilation — even if your vision seems fine. Pregnancy may worsen diabetic retinopathy, so if you’re pregnant, your eye doctor may recommend additional eye exams throughout your pregnancy.

Contact your eye doctor right away if your vision changes suddenly or becomes blurry, spotty or hazy

Causes
Over time, too much sugar in your blood can lead to the blockage of the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina, cutting off its blood supply. As a result, the eye attempts to grow new blood vessels. But these new blood vessels don’t develop properly and can leak easily.

There are two types of diabetic retinopathy:

(1)Early diabetic retinopathy.
(2)Advanced diabetic retinopathy

Risk factors
Anyone who has diabetes can develop diabetic retinopathy. Risk of developing eye condition can increase as a result of:

Duration of diabetes — the longer you have diabetes, the greater your risk of developing diabetic retinopathy
-Poor control of your blood sugar level
-High blood pressure
-High cholesterol
-Pregnancy
-Tobacco use

Complications
Diabetic retinopathy involves the abnormal growth of blood vessels in the retina. Complications can lead to serious vision problems:

-Vitreous hemorrhage.
-Retinal detachment.
-Glaucoma
-Blindness
Prevention
You can’t always prevent diabetic retinopathy. However, regular eye exams, good control of your blood sugar and blood pressure, and early intervention for vision problems can help prevent severe vision loss.

If you have diabetes, reduce your risk of getting diabetic retinopathy by doing the following:
-Manage your diabetes.
-Monitor your blood sugar level.
-Ask your doctor about a glycosylated hemoglobin test.
-Keep your blood pressure and cholesterol under control.
-If you smoke or use other types of tobacco, ask your doctor to help you quit
-Pay attention to vision changes.
Remember, diabetes doesn’t necessarily lead to vision loss. Taking an active role in diabetes management can go a long way toward preventing complications.
Treatment: If you have retinopathy you’ll need prompt surgical treatment. Depending on the specific problems with your retina, options may include Photocoagulation.

or Visit Utsav Eye Clinic 

Utsav Eye Clinic: Eye Clinic in Kharghar | Eye Specialist Doctor

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Monsoon Eye Care Tips by Utsav Eye Clinic

Monsoon brings joy as you say goodbye to summer – and your sunglasses (remember, they also protect your eyes from infection). Monsoons bring with them an army of infections that cause eye pain and discomfort, so don’t ignore your eye health this monsoon. Viral infections are known to thrive and spread during rains due to increased moisture in the air.
Proper eye care should become a priority during monsoons to help protect from infections like conjunctivitis, stye, dry eyes and corneal ulcers which can lead to blindness.

By Dr. Anand Kumar the precautions, you can take during monsoons to maintain good eye health.

 

1)Precautions are usually based on hygiene. Avoid touching your eyes with dirty hands.
2)Ask your children to not touch their eyes.
3)If you (or someone around you) suspect you’ve got or are getting conjunctivitis, wash your eyes gently and use a cold compress. The best thing would be to see a doctor.
4)If someone at home is down with conjunctivitis, wash your hands after administering drops.
5)Redness, irritation & itching are common monsoon-related problems, especially after too much reading, long hours at the computer or watching too much television, and most hospitals treat such problems with lubricating eye drops. However, if you have such a problem, don’t self-medicate – ask a doctor.
6)Avoid sharing your towel and similar personal items with others, because infections mostly spread through hands, clothes and other commonly touched items.
7)A stye is a common eye infection that occurs during monsoons and is caused due to bacteria. It manifests as a painful lump along the eyelid and is normally treated with the help of a warm compress, though a visit to the doctor is highly recommended.
8)In the case of red-eye, avoid over-the-counter eye drops as they may contain steroids which can be harmful, and seek expert advice. Also, avoid using a contact lens during this period.
9)Wearing glasses when traveling helps.
10)Avoid roadside food.
11)Always wash your hands after coming from outside.
12)Try to keep children away from puddles and waterlogged areas. Children often like to have fun in or around such places but they are high bacteria prone.

Utsav Eye Clinic
Dr. Anand Kumar
http://utsaveyeclinic.com/

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Getting your kids to wear their glasses

Getting your kids to wear their glasses

Getting the glasses to stay on

Many Eye specialist doctors will tell you that once your child realizes that they see better with their glasses, they’ll be much more likely to leave them on, and even ask for them first thing in the morning.  And that’s true, but the trick is getting through that initial stage when they don’t want these funny things sitting on their face.

Every child is different, some will take to their glasses immediately, while others fight tooth and nail for months.  A recent poll shows that about 65% children were wearing them well in a week or less, but more than 15% of the kids take longer than a month before they’ll wear them reliably.  Odds are your child will surprise you and take to their glasses quickly, but if they don’t, know that you’r not alone in your struggles.

While there are a lot of strategies to get your child to leave their glasses on, the key seems to be to stay calm and positive (which is easier said than done) and consistent about keeping them on (ok, this is also easier said than done).  When your child takes them off, put them back on with a smile, but don’t make a big deal about it.  If they are really fighting or upset, set the glasses to the side for a few minutes until your child calms down and try again.  You’ll also want to have activities on hand when you put those glasses on.  Boredom and glasses do not mix!

The following strategies have been suggested by parents of our kid patients who needed to wear glasses. They may help you in your struggle to make your children keep on their glasses too.

  • Talk about how nice he or she looks in the glasses.
  •  When putting glasses on your child, do it with a smile. “While we were trying glasses on Palak, she was crying and we were getting upset, too, and we kept apologizing to her. Dr. Kumar recommended that instead, we show her how happy we are when we put glasses on her (even when we aren’t). It didn’t completely stop her crying, but she definitely calmed down a notch once we started acting happier” says Mrs. Shah, the mother of a 7 year cheerful girl residing in Kharghar.

glasses in children

  • Show them glasses-wearing characters (like Arthur, or Harry Potter for older kids). This helps them accept the glasses by making them less self-conscious.
  • If your child keeps taking off their glasses, simply put them back on with a smile. If they don’t let you put them on, don’t make a big deal, simply set them aside and try again in a few minutes. “It took about 2 weeks for Zeeshan to get to a point where he leaves the glasses on most of the time” says Mrs. Chaudhary, a resident of Nerul, Navi Mumbai.
  • Most kids, especially teenagers are conscious about their looks particularly in front of their school mates. Hence it may be a good idea to speak to the class teachers and close friends and ask them to appreciate the child’s new look.

spectacles in children

  • When she put on her pair of glasses, I rewarded her with her favorite cookies and explained that each times she wears her glasses we’ll show her how proud we are by giving her a cookie. She seems motivated by this and put them on 4 more times before dinner.
  • Take off your child’s glasses when they’re in the car – at least at the beginning. It’s likely they’ll take off their glasses and throw them somewhere where they might fall out of the car or get smushed when you open the door.
  • Mrs. Tawade of New Panvel thinks the reward system works best for most kids. She says “We bribed him with a new Thomas toy if he would put them on and leave them alone, so he did, and Daddy let him pick out the most expensive Thomas set that the store had.”

 

We wish you the best in your efforts to make your child keep their glasses on. If you have any strategy that has worked for you, kindly share it with us for the benefit of other parents.

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